How Best Do We Transition Our Birds to a New Home?

Joe S. seeks an answer:

 

I am looking for advice on how to best transition our birds to our new home.

 

We are moving into a new house next week (not long-distance, just across town).

 

We have a 6 yo Senegal and a 5yo parrotlet who have only lived at our current home.

 

I know that birds can be very stressed by changes like this, and I want to make this move as easy as possible for them.

 

“Appreciate the advice and love reading your blogs!”

 

Dear Joe

 

Our birds are a lot more resilient than you may realize.

 

The more change you introduce to birds, the easier it for them to adapt.

 

They really just want to be with you.

 

If you don’t get stressed, they won’t get so stressed either.

 

It sounds like a short trip.

 

Will they be traveling in their cages or small carriers?

 

Do you have temporary cages that you can use for a day or two?

 

You have choices, put the birds into temporary cages in your current home, while you move their cages into the new home, or put them into the temporary cages at the new home while you set their cages in the new home.

 

It depends on it you have been moving little by little or have to do it all in one day.

 

If you have to do it all in one day, I recommend that you tote them to the new location and set them in a room that can be closed off from the commotion of the moving.

 

Leave them in the room with a radio on low, a soft light, food, treats, and don’t open the doors until all the doors, windows, etc are secured, the movers are gone, etc.

 

They should be fine in their carriers for even a day or two with fresh food and water.

 

 

If they are flighted, you may wish to clip their wings this one time so they don’t fly around crashing into windows and unknown areas when you do let them out of their cage for the first time.

 

Especially if you don’t have inner doors that you prevent them from just flying out if opened.

 

Note: When freshly clipped, the bird(s) should be set on the floor so they don’t just fly off the tops of their cages and drop to the floor.

 

Once they have molted out the clipped feathers they will be very familiar with their new location and know what areas are theirs to go to.

 

If you don’t want to clip them, then wait until early evening, have dim lights on.

 

Doors closed to all rooms other than the room they will be let out in, then bring them out, if you can, put the cages on the floor, open the doors and let them crawl out and survey their new home.

 

Don’t make changes to their cages in the afternoon or evening as it can be scary for them as they have to deal with new objects in the dark and they can contribute to new phobias.

 

A Better Bird Ep 13 How Bird Proof Is Your Home? ~ video

 

Do your cage changes in the morning until noon or so.

 

They will have the time to figure out the changes.

 

Just talk to them often in calm, sweet, uplifting sounds and they will be happy with you anywhere.

 

I hope this helps, please let me know if you need anything.

 

Kindest Regards,

Catherine

Mitch Rezman

He's handled a 1000 birds of numerous species when they visited monthly birdie brunches in the old Portage Park (Chicago, IL) facility. The one with the parrot playground. Mitch has written and published more than 1100 articles on captive bird care. He's met with the majority of  CEO's and business owners for most brands in the pet bird space and does so on a regular basis. He also constantly interacts with avian veterinarians and influencers globally.

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